Why Your Kids Should Play Only One Sport…Each Season + MORE

Why Your Kids Should Play Only One Sport…Each Season + MORE
national flag football tournament 1444856503 272675633 Why Your Kids Should Play Only One Sport…Each Season + MORE

Understanding Cricket: The Basics of the Game + MORE

Cricket is a game of bat and ball, which is played between 2 teams of 11 players each. It is played on a pitch 22 yards long in the center of an oval field. Both teams take turns to bat, scoring as many runs as possible, while the other team fields. These turns are known as innings. With over 120 mi.... More »
national youth football tournaments 1502253851 1586316585 Why Your Kids Should Play Only One Sport…Each Season + MORE

Revisiting the Head First Slide and Breakaway Base Debates + MORE

By Dev K. Mishra, M.D. President, Sideline Sports Doc Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Key Points: A recent study shows that head first sliding has a higher injury risk than feet first sliding Additionally, breakaway bases also reduce injury risk from sliding .... More »

YOUTH BASEBALL TRENDS: “Can’t Anybody Here Play This Game?”

When Casey Stengel was managing the hapless New York Mets in their first year of existence in 1962, Casey became so frustrated with his team’s lack of fundamental baseball that he once exclaimed in frustration: “Can’t anybody here play this game?” That moment was well over 50.... More »

BOOK REVIEW: HEMORRHOIDS AT HALFTIME -An Insider’s View of High School Athletics

Over the course of my doing my radio show over the years, I have assembled a pretty substantial library of books on sports in this country. Many of these works are written by dedicated individuals who share my passion and concern for what’s happening to kids in sports. And the vast majority of the.... More »
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3 Strategies for Parenting Competitive Twins (Or Siblings Close in Age) + MORE

Twins… double the love, the fun, and the joy! But sometimes twins can be double the trouble – or at least that’s how it feels when sibling competition kicks into high gear and you’re trying to manage the chaos in “stereo.” And it’s not just twins. Parents with siblings close in a.... More »
My family is wrapping up one of the busiest seasons we’ve had. The summer time should be a time to unwind and relax, but for us, I have to admit, it has been a grind. And most of it has been self-induced. It’s probably the challenge that plagues most sports loving families. Multiple kids playing multiple sports…

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A Higher Purpose Than Winning

– changingthegameproject.com

If you put a bunch of top coaches, sport scientists and psychologists in a room together, they may not agree on much. They would agree on one thing though: an overemphasis on winning and competition, instead of practice and development, is detrimental to the long term performance of young athletes. Unfortunately, today in youth sports […

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Buzzfeed asked 20 established writers of color for their best advice to writers just starting out. The resulting 39 answers make for enlightening reading. For anyone.
Here are the three questions Buzzfeed asked:

What piece of advice would you, as a writer of color, give to burgeoning writers/journalists of color?
What do you know now about being a writer of color that you wish you’d known when you first started?
Is there anything you did as a writer starting out that you now regret?
Here’s the first answer, from Cord Jefferson, who left Gawker earlier this year to write for LeBron James’ upcoming TV show, “Survivor’s Remorse…

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“Football is a simple game; 22 men chase a ball for 90 minutes and at the end, the Germans always win.” – Gary Lineker Sunday’s game was scoreless into the 112th minute, but still an exciting one with an attacking, offensive mindset for both teams. That said, I am not writing this post to give […]

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